Articles Posted in Litigation

By California Trust Litigation Attorney – Ted Hankin

Over the years I have watched many attorney-themed television programs.  I understand, given the time allotted, one must take the case and try it to conclusion within the obligatory one hour format.  Unfortunately, this perception of a sprint to the finish line is not reality; litigation is more in the nature of an endurance contest in California.

Much of the time involved in a litigated case (let’s take a business case as an example) involves discussion with the attorney to insure that he/she has a complete understanding of the facts, analysis by the attorney to determine what rights have been violated by the actions of the other side, and drafting a complaint.

Once the complaint has been drafted and approved by the client, it then is filed, with an accompanying summons, with the court.  After filing, it is sent out for service on the defendant.  Once the defendant has been served, the defendant, in California, has thirty days in which to respond.  A response can be an answer (the case is then “at issue”) or a demurrer.  If a demurrer (everything in the complaint may be assumed to be true, but still doesn’t give the plaintiff a right to the relief sought), the court might set it out three or more months before scheduling a hearing (for oral argument).

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In California, a typical estate planning tool is the revocable trust. A husband and wife usually create one jointly, with the two of them serving as co-trustees until one dies. Then the other becomes the sole trustee. When the surviving spouse dies, the trust will usually name a successor trustee to take over the responsibilities of trustee.

A key feature of a revocable trust is to recognize that what was once a revocable trust becomes an irrevocable one when both of its creators/settlors/grantors die ( a portion of it could become irrevocable on the first death, depending on the language of the trust).

As the successor trustee, one of your responsibilities is to notify all named beneficiaries of the trust and heirs of the decedent that the trust has become irrevocable. This is as set forth in California Probate Code §16061.7, which prescribes the notice that is to be given by the successor trustee.

In California, Probate Code Sections 15300-15301 protect the principal and income of a spendthrift trust from judgment creditors. A spendthrift trust is one where there is a restraint written the trust instrument to prevent a transfer of a beneficiary’s interest. This protection does not exist with respect to distributions from a spendthrift trust, once the distributions become due and payable (Probate Code Section 15301(b)); it also does not exist with respect to support orders for spousal or child support that exist against the beneficiary of the trust (Probate Code Section 15305).

Further, under Probate Code Section 15306.5, up to 25% (but no more) of the principal of a spendthrift trust may be reached by judgment creditors. Additional rules apply if there are both support orders and judgment creditors, with the general rule being that the support orders have a priority over those of judgment creditors.

The take away is that while spendthrift trusts are useful, they are not 100% bulletproof. Some portion of them will be made available to creditors regardless of the grantor’s intent.

Roughly 10,000 Baby Boomers will turn 65 today, and about 10,000 more will cross that threshold every day. (Pew Research)

With the massive increase in baby boomers retiring over the next decade, proper estate planning is more important than ever! When you are looking for an estate lawyer to assist you with planning — experience and knowledge from a reputable attorney is key.

What is estate planning? Estate Planning isn’t just about protecting assets, it’s about peace of mind for you and your loved ones. Our comprehensive approach is a cost-effective “no homework” way to protect your assets and prevent disputes that might arise in the future.

Don’t be tempted by “Do It Yourself” guides and kits. I have known experienced professionals whose loved ones have seen estates ruined by poorly thought-out cookie cutter solutions that left families vulnerable to taxes, litigating family members, probate, guardianship issues and unknown creditors.

Here are a few questions to consider:
• How do I insure the financial security of my spouse and children?
• How do I avoid family conflicts and ensure equitable treatment of my children?
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A typical case will involve a family member contacting me to complain about the dispositions in a will or trust of a deceased relative, with allegations that another family member or a caregiver “got” to the deceased relative to unduly benefit themselves at the expense of the other family members.

To properly analyze the case, I obtain copies of all prior testamentary documents (to determine if the terms are at variance with the current documents, and how great a variance there is).

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You have been successful and obtained a California judgment against your adversary. However, you have been unsuccessful in collecting on it. Should you be concerned about the passage of time? After all, interest on judgments is generally 10% annually in California.

The answer is, it depends. If you have a civil judgment, it must be renewed through the courts every ten years. If not, it will become unenforceable (California Code of Civil Procedure Section 683.020). Renewal is accomplished by submitting an application for renewal to the court prior to the expiration of the ten year period (California Code of Civil Procedure Section 683.120).

However, if you have a family law judgment (or order), it never expires (California Family Code Section 291). This is a very useful quality, if you should find, for example, that your ex-spouse’s parent has died and that ex-spouse is about to come into enough money to satisfy that more than 10 year old judgment or order……

What is my role as an estate planner in California? I gather personal and financial information from my clients in order to assess what estate planning product or products are best suited to their needs.

During our conversation, which usually lasts an hour, I learn about family conflicts. I am sometimes asked what they should do about their conflict. I will venture an opinion, but I always emphasize that it is just an opinion.

At the end of the conversation, if I have not already done so, I explain the different tools and techniques that I think are suitable to their situation. Once we have agreed, we adjourn.

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Listen to Ted Hankin as he appears on Lisa Caprelli’s Business Experience Radio Show via KLAA AM380 home of the Anaheim Angels, as a featured guest. During the show I will be interviewed concerning my business experiences and advice that I give to business owners.

The Business Experience show presents success stories and challenges to its listening audience. Lisa Caprelli connects businesses and entrepreneurs with the right networks to help market, grow and brand.

Please listen in and ask your questions; we expect it to be very interesting and informative for the audience.